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5 Amazing Benefits of Rock Climbing That Will Change Your Life

The benefits of rock climbing don’t just end at exercise—that’s where they begin!

Rock Climbing Woman

Rock climbing—it’s exhilarating, dangerous, takes a good deal of skill and even bigger amount of guts to climb up, or across, natural rock formations or artificial rock walls. Regardless if you are a beginner or advanced rock climber, you’ve stumbled across some amazing content on climbing that will leave you wanting to jump up, grab your gear, and start climbing! But first, let’s take a look at all the tremendous benefits of rock climbing—there’s more than you think.

Rock Climbing

 

1. Physical Benefits

Rock climbing  is one of the most effective total-body exercises for both men and women. It’s one of the few sports that can both compete against each other. A misperception is that climbing requires strong upper body to begin with, and this notion frequently prevents girls from engaging with the sport. However, an effective rock climber understands that technique, balance, and leg strength are all important aspects. Let’s look at what you’ll achieve exercise-wise while climbing:

  • Building lean, endurance, and core muscles
  • Aerobic training with low impact
  • Increasing blood flow with the circulatory system 
  • Fingers and hands gaining flexibility and strength
  • Upper arms and forearms gaining strength & conditioning 
  • Shoulder blades, neck, and upper back gaining strength & conditioning 

It’s noted that climbing can improve core muscles even more effectively than training programs created specifically for that area of your body. The core stabilizes your body, resulting in it being stronger and less prone to injury. Climbing helps develop your wrists and forearms, as well as your biceps, shoulders, neck, upper back, lats, lower back, abs, glutes, thighs, and calves. Rock climbing boosts your entire body, particularly your cardiovascular system.

No matter how strong your upper body is (or isn’t), you can start where you are now and build your way up to the skill level you’d like to achieve. Climbing engages every part of your body: From your fingers and forearms gripping the climbing hold,  your abs and core as you bring your legs into position, to your entire body as you propel yourself up with your legs and pull yourself up with your arms.

Rock Climbing

2. Giving You a Boost in Other Sports

Climbing complements and improves performance in other sports as well. Climbing aids in the development of the fundamental muscles in sports such as football, tennis, soccer and running, and cycling.  The secondary muscles used is sports such as these also benefit from climbing, but are not fully developed in rock climbing practice. 

Rock Climbing

3. Get Rid of the Stress

Want to get rid of the stress in your life, but not sure how?  Ascending into the world of rock climbing could be just the way to get rid of it. Climbing is a great way to relax and clear your mind after a particularly stressful day. Let’s take a look at a list of a few of the benefits: 

  • Spatial Awareness
  • Decision-Making
  • Visualization
  • Solving Issues
  • Setting Objectives
  • Planning
  • Concentration
  • Determination
  • Self-assurance
  • Stress Reduction
  • a sense of accomplishment

One of the most helpful features of climbing for many people is stress alleviation. The climbing wall takes all you’ve got and then takes it all off your shoulders. When you’re climbing, you’re focused on your bodily motions and the objective of reaching the peak. The actual world fades away, leaving just you and gravity to contend with.

 After a strenuous climbing exercise, your endorphins have peaked, and you may return to normal life with a clear mind. Whether it’s a new route or one you’ve been working on, you’ll find yourself with a  different perspective each time.

Rock Climbing

4. The Benefits Don’t Stop With Adults

As children, our inherent human tendency is to climb everything we can get our hands onto. Nowadays, there are many more cases of poor muscle tone in children than there were previously, and this can be attributed to the fact that our way of life is no longer what it once was. Adding in technology and injury fear, the cold hard fact is that our children are not as active as they should be.

Each climbing route is a puzzle that requires time and strategy, forcing the climber to make judgments when they arrive at a location and decide where to continue on from there. Climbing necessitates making on-the-spot judgments, committing, and following through. It’s necessary for you to be able to analyze an issue, seek a solution, and then carry out a strategy, skills that kids need to develop for successful and meaningful lives.

Rock Climbing

5. Your Social Life Benefits on That Upward Climb

Besides your physical and mental skills constantly being improved,  climbing helps build self-confidence. When you’re trying something new or challenging, it can be nice to have others with similar or more advanced skill levels around you. With any passion, it’s always  extra fun to have people you can share it with. Just a few of the added social values:

  • Friendship and networking
  • Listening and communication abilities
  • Trust
  • Leadership capabilities
  • Character development

Although rock climbing is generally a one-on-one sport, it may nonetheless be considered a team sport because you are never alone. You’ll either be climbing with a group of friends, classmates, coworkers, or family members.

Every climber will have the opportunity to be both a student and a teacher, learning from others and then passing that information on. One minute you’ll be the climber receiving encouragement or guidance from others, and the next you’ll be a part of the group encouraging new thrill seekers. Ready for the climb?

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